Posted by: pdbjr2005 | September 22, 2007

“My”Space30 Examines ebay.Com Part 21

“My”Space30 Examines eBay.Com Part 21
Current mood: determined
Category: Blogging

Hello Everyone.,

An Introduction to Bidding and Buying on eBay.

Have you noticed that whenever you open a newspaper, watch the TV or have a conversation, people seem to be talking about eBay? If you’ve never used it and you’ve no idea what it’s all about, then the chances are that you’re starting to feel a little left out. But don’t worry! This email contains everything you need to know about the basics of bidding and buying on eBay.

So What is eBay?

eBay is an online auction website – and not just any auction site, but the biggest one in the world. If you know how an auction works, then you already know how roughly eBay works. Someone adds something they want to sell to the site, and then buyers come along and place bids on it. The highest bid wins the item! It’s that simple.

eBay being an online auction makes a big difference, though. Buying and selling are not reserved for any elite. eBay accept almost any item, no matter how small, and will then advertise it on their sites all over the world. It’s a powerful combination of an auction and a slightly chaotic marketplace.

What is Bidding?

Bidding is when you say how much you will pay for an item in an auction. Bidding on eBay, however, doesn’t work in exactly the same way as a normal auction, at least in theory. On eBay, you tell the site what the maximum you are willing to pay for each item is, and then eBay places the bids on your behalf. That means you could say you were willing to pay up to $100 for something and only have to pay $50, if that was the highest maximum bid anyone else placed.

It’s not as complicated as it sounds – the best way to get used to it is to give it a try. First, the best thing to do is to go to the eBay website designed for your country. If you don’t know the address for it, just go to http://www.ebay.com and it will tell you there. Now, on the front page you should see a big box marked ‘search’: just type in anything that you’d like to buy there.

Wasn’t that easy? Now you should have a list of items for sale in front of you, along with how much people are currently bidding for them and the time when bidding ends for each item. If you click one of these, you can read the description, and then – if you’re happy with the item and happy to pay more than the current highest bidder is – you can bid!

How Do I Bid?

Go ahead and scroll down to the bottom of an item’s description page, and type the maximum you are willing to pay (your maximum bid) into the box. Then simply press the ‘place bid’ button – you will need to sign in once you press the button, or go through a quick registration process if you don’t have an eBay username).

If someone else’s maximum bid on that item is higher than yours, then eBay will tell you and give you the opportunity to bid again. Otherwise, you’re now the new highest bidder! All you need to do now is wait until the end of the auction – if someone else outbids you, then eBay will email you and you can bid again.

All sounds great, doesn’t it? But by now you might be wondering whether a site as chaotic as eBay can really be all that safe to buy from. That’s why the next blog entry in this series will be about your rights when you buy from eBay.
Thank You.,

Paul Burns Jr, Author “My”Space30 Blog Community

Be sure to check the buzz at http://www.mybloglog.com/buzz/members/pdbjr2005/, as well ashttp://www.PDBJR2005.wordpress.com.,

del.icio.us/PDBJR2005 I am PDBJR2005 on del.icio.us
add PDBJR2005 to your network Add me to your network

http://technorati.com/claim/gcjthu3xp

Recent Readers

View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile

View Entire Community
Provided by MyBlogLog

Posted by: pdbjr2005 | September 22, 2007

“My”Space30 Gets Paid To Surf The Net

“My”Space30 On Getting Paid To Surf The Net
Current mood: busy
Category: Jobs, Work, Careers

“My”Space30 OFFERS HELL FIRE HOT OFF THE PRESS NEWS
Current mood: accomplished
Category: Blogging

 

“My”Space30 OFFERS HELL FIRE HOT OFF THE PRESS NEWS

“My”Space30 OFFERS HELL FIRE HOT OFF THE PRESS NEWS

 

Category: MySpace

Join Now
HELLO EVERYONE.,

HERE IS HOW YOU GET PAID TO WEB SURF.,

Do You Realize How Valuable You Are?
Advertisers, search providers, and online retailers are paying billions to reach you while you surf. How much of that money are you getting?

You Deserve A Piece of the Action

AGLOCO gets paid by companies to reach our Members through our Viewbar software.We give that money back to you.

Build the Community, Make More Money
Through our Referral Program, we reward those who are helping to build this Global Community. The bigger the community, the more money AGLOCO makes for its Members.

What’s the Catch?

No catch. Sign Up, refer your friends, download the free Viewbar (Download Link) software and surf the Internet as you normally would. DON’T FORGET TO SIGN UP USING THE Sign Up or Join Now Links provided on this blog page.,

Privacy Counts.
Your information will never be sold, rented,or shared with anyone else. Bulletproof Privacy is a core commitment of AGLOCO.

Join Now

Or Use referral Code BBHD2025

Thank You.,

Paul Burns Jr, Author “My”Space30 Blog Community

Be sure to check the buzz at http://www.mybloglog.com/buzz/members/pdbjr2005/, as well ashttp://www.PDBJR2005.wordpress.com.,

del.icio.us/PDBJR2005 I am PDBJR2005 on del.icio.us
add PDBJR2005 to your network Add me to your network

http://technorati.com/claim/gcjthu3xp

Recent Readers

View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile

View Entire Community
Provided by MyBlogLog

Posted by: pdbjr2005 | September 22, 2007

“My”Space30 Examines ebay.Com Part 20

“My”Space30 Examines eBay.Com Part 20
Current mood: artistic
Category: Blogging

Hello Everyone.

Here is10 Tips for Increasing Your eBay Response.

So you’ve got the buyer in front of your auction, and they’ve read the description. They’re must be interested, or they wouldn’t be looking… but just how can you push them over that line and make them leave a bid? Read on for some tips.

Improve your picture: In all that description writing, you might have missed the vital importance of your item’s picture. A picture with bad lighting or an intrusive background looks amateurish and won’t make anyone want to buy from you.

Add an About Me page: You’ll be surprised how much you can reassure bidders just by creating an About Me page and putting a little bit about yourself on your business on there. You can also have a few special offers there for people who bother to look at the page, and let people subscribe to your mailing list so that you can email them updates.

Use SquareTrade: Signing up at SquareTrade and displaying their logo on your auctions shows that you are committed to have them resolve any disputes that arise. You always see this on PowerSellers auctions – it makes you look more professional.

Write terms and conditions: Have the ‘small print’ clearly visible on all your auctions, giving details of things like shipping times and prices, your refund policy, and any other business practices you might have. This helps build confidence with buyers.

Show off your feedback: Copy and paste a selection of the feedback comments you’re most proud of to each item’s description page, instead of making bidders go and look for it. If you have 100% positive feedback, be sure to write that on every auction too.

Add NR to your titles: If you have extra space in a title, put ‘NR’ (no reserve) on the end. Bidders prefer auctions that don’t have a reserve price, and doing this lets them see that yours don’t.

Benefits not features: Make sure your description focuses on the benefits that your item can give to the customer, not just its features. This is a classic sales technique. If you have trouble with this, remember: ‘cheap’ is a feature, ‘save money’ is a benefit.

List more items: If you want more people to respond to your items, then list more items! You might find you have better like listing items at the same time, instead of one-by-one. There’s no need to use a Dutch auction – you can just keep two or three auctions going at once for an item you have more than one of in stock.

Accept unusual payment methods: To reach those last few buyers, accept payment methods that many sellers don’t, like cheques.

Buy some upgrades: The best upgrade is the most expensive one, which makes your item appear first in search results. In crowded categories, you might find that this is worth the money.

Once you’ve got some buyers, you want to keep them coming back to you. The next blog entry will show you how to turn one-time buyers into long-term customers.

Thank You

Paul Burns Jr, Author “My”Space30 Blog

Be sure to check the buzz at http://www.mybloglog.com/buzz/members/pdbjr2005/, as well as

http://www.PDBJR2005.wordpress.com.,

del.icio.us/PDBJR2005 I am PDBJR2005 on del.icio.us
add PDBJR2005 to your network Add me to your network

http://technorati.com/claim/gcjthu3xp

Recent Readers

View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile

View Entire Community
Provided by MyBlogLog

Posted by: pdbjr2005 | September 22, 2007

“My”Space30 Examines ebay.Com Part 19

“My”Space30 Examines eBay.Com Part 19
Current mood: artistic
Category: Blogging

Hello Everyone.,

eBay Description Writing Tips.

Once you’ve drawn the buyers in with your title, the next thing to do is to tell them all about your item with the description. But just what should you write in your description?

At its heart, your item description is an ad. Without making it too obvious, you should be writing sales copy. You’re trying to get buyers excited about your products, and that’s usually hard – but on eBay, if you have the right thing to sell and give enough details, the buyers almost excite themselves.

Technical Details.

Include every technical detail you know, including the item’s manufacturer, its condition, how big it is, where and when it was made, its history, and anything else special about it. Don’t be too boring, though: the best descriptions are written in friendly, conversational language, and show a real knowledge of the item. Whatever you do, make sure you tell the truth!

Remember that most of the people who’ll be buying your item will be just as knowledgeable about it as you are, if not more – this is their hobby, and they’re experts. Don’t feel like you need to explain the basics of the item: just go into as much technical detail as you can. As a rule, don’t write anything in the description if you don’t know what it means, as the chances are someone will, and if you’ve got it slightly wrong then you’ll look like you don’t know what you’re talking about.

Interesting Details.

You might find that you enjoy writing a few things about how you got the item, why you’re selling it, and who you think might like it. This isn’t strictly necessary, but it gives your auctions some character and a personal touch, and can make people more likely to trust you. People might wonder what you’re doing selling 500 CDs all at once, and if you tell them the reason, then they’ll feel reassured that nothing dodgy is going on. If you’re selling them because you’re having a baby and you need the space, just say so.

Write as Much as You Can.

Leave nothing out of your description, even if that seems to you like it makes it cumbersomely long. There is no way you can be too thorough: someone, somewhere will appreciate that you took the time to write the extra information.

Don’t assume that anyone who wants extra information will email you to ask a question: many buyers are shy and won’t do it. Think of questions that buyers might have and add the answers to your description, as people generally tend to ask the same questions over and over again.

Each time a buyer does email you with a question, you should both answer their question and update your description so that it will include the answer next time. If people ask questions that are answered in the description, try putting these parts of the auction on a line alone, or in bold, to make them easier to notice.

In the next Blog entry, we’ll focus on increasing the number of buyers who respond to your auctions.

Thank You

Paul Burns Jr, Author “My”Space30 Blog

Be sure to check the buzz at http://www.mybloglog.com/buzz/members/pdbjr2005/, as well as

http://www.PDBJR2005.wordpress.com.,

del.icio.us/PDBJR2005 I am PDBJR2005 on del.icio.us
add PDBJR2005 to your network Add me to your network

http://technorati.com/claim/gcjthu3xp

Recent Readers

View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile

View Entire Community
Provided by MyBlogLog

Posted by: pdbjr2005 | September 13, 2007

“My”Space30 Examines eBay.Com Part 18

“My”Space30 Examines eBay.Com Part 18
Current mood: creative
Category: Blogging

Hello Everyone.,

eBay Title Writing Tips.

Trying to be help your buyers find your auctions can be a truly daunting task. Most people only search eBay by title, not by description, and that means that you only have those 55 characters of the title to cover all the possible search terms. That’s not easy. In this email, I’ll give you a few pointers.

Don’t bother with eBay clichés: There are plenty of eBay auction titles that say things like “Super rare camera wow look low price”. These are stupid things to put in your title, as no-one is going to search for them.

Think like a buyer: If you were looking for your item, then what exactly would you type into that box? If you think it’d help, try searching yourself to find someone else selling your item. What were the first things you thought of typing?

Think like other sellers: Keep an eye on which sellers are doing best with items like yours, and try to copy their title styles – if it works for them, it can work for you.

Be specific: You should be sure to write the item’s brand and specific model number in the title, as people will often search only for this information. Make sure that you also say exactly what the item is.

A Few Examples.

Here are a few examples of good titles. They’re real, and they’re on eBay right now, making their sellers money. So what makes them good?

“Dell Latitude Laptop P3 500mhz Notebook PC Computer”

If you know about computers, you’ll know instantly what this auction is selling. It has manufacturer (Dell) and product line (Latitude), followed by a few technical specifications (P3 500mhz is the processor speed). Notice also that the title includes the four words ‘laptop’, ‘notebook’, ‘PC’ and ‘computer’, as the seller wants people looking for any of those words to see his auction.

“OASIS Don’t Believe the Truth CD Album (New)”

This auction for a CD is well formatted: it gives the artist name in capital letters, followed by the album name. It then manages to include the two key words ‘CD’ and ‘album’, as well as the word ‘new’ – that means that anyone searching for ‘new oasis cd’, ‘oasis new album’ and so on will find this auction.

“1840 Penny Black stamp, certificate, four margins”

Here’s a slightly more obscure one, from the exciting world of stamp collecting. A penny black is one of the oldest and most famous stamps. It uses a few key words that collectors will consider important: ‘four margins’ indicates that the stamp has been cut out with some margins around it and so isn’t damaged, and ‘certificate’ tells you that the item has a certificate of authenticity – it’s a real penny black. Remember to use every bit of space to squeeze in as much important information as you can in the title.

So now that you’ve written a winning title, you need to start on a great description. The next blog entry will show you how.

Thank You

Paul Burns Jr, Author “My”Space30 Blog

Be sure to check the buzz at http://www.mybloglog.com/buzz/members/pdbjr2005/, as well as

http://www.PDBJR2005.wordpress.com.,

del.icio.us/PDBJR2005 I am PDBJR2005 on del.icio.us
add PDBJR2005 to your network Add me to your network

http://technorati.com/claim/gcjthu3xp

Recent Readers

View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile

View Entire Community
Provided by MyBlogLog

Posted by: pdbjr2005 | September 13, 2007

“My”Space30 Examines eBay.Com Part 17

“My”Space30 Examines eBay.Com Part 17
Current mood: creative
Category: Blogging

Hello Everyone

How to Choose the Right eBay Product Category.

Some people think it’s easy to choose the right eBay category, and often it is. Sometimes, though, it might not be quite clear exactly what to go for.

Why is it Even Important?

Plenty of people use the category system to find items, when they’re not looking for something specific. If your item is listed in the wrong category – or you’ve just given up and listed it in ‘Everything Else’ – then these people aren’t going to find your auction.

Also, listing items in the wrong categories is against eBay’s rules, and eBay say they will remove any auctions that are wrongly categorised. They don’t often actually do this, but it’s not worth the risk – especially since breaking any rules can cause them to penalise your account, including losing PowerSeller status if you have it.

So What Can You Do?

eBay will suggest categories for you when you sell your item, if you type in a few words to describe the item on the category selection page and click ‘search’. You can make the best of this feature by typing in exactly what your item is, with brand name and model number (if any), so that eBay can find the best category for you.

If that doesn’t work for you, then search yourself for items like yours, and pay attention to which category most of them seem to be in (you can see this near the top of each item’s description page). Try different words and see which ones come back with the most results. You can also browse through all the available categories from eBay’s front page.

Remember that the more specific the category is, the better – use as many subcategories as are appropriate. Don’t just list your HP laptop in the ‘Computers’ category, for example – list it in ‘Computers > Laptops > HP’. Don’t worry: your item will still appear in the ‘Computers’ category, as well as ‘Computers > Laptops’, because items listed in subcategories are always listed in every category above.

Take some time to look through all the categories and get familiar with the way eBay as a whole is laid out. After all, that’s better than getting a few months down the line and finding that you still think of eBay’s category system like it’s some kind of scary jungle.

What if More Than One Category Fits?

Don’t worry, eBay have you covered. For a small extra fee, you can list your item in an extra category, to increase the number of potential buyers who will see it. This isn’t always worth it, though – some items only really fit properly in one category, and listing them in extra categories is just a waste.

Once you know where to list your item, the next step is to write your auction’s title. The title is the most important thing about your auction – the difference between a good title and a bad title can be the difference between $10 and $100. That’s why I’ll take you through the dos and don’ts in the next blog entry.

Thank You

Paul Burns Jr, Author “My”Space30 Blog

Be sure to check the buzz at http://www.mybloglog.com/buzz/members/pdbjr2005/, as well as

http://www.PDBJR2005.wordpress.com.,

del.icio.us/PDBJR2005 I am PDBJR2005 on del.icio.us
add PDBJR2005 to your network Add me to your network

http://technorati.com/claim/gcjthu3xp

Recent Readers

View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile

View Entire Community
Provided by MyBlogLog

Posted by: pdbjr2005 | September 12, 2007

“My”Space30 Examines eBay.Com Part 9

’My”Space30 Examines Ebay.Com Part 9
Current mood: accomplished
Category: Blogging

Hello Everyone.,

What’s Your eBay Reputation Really Worth?

Your eBay reputation is everything you are on eBay – without it, you’re nothing. Your reputation is worth as much as every sale you will ever make.

If you’ve ever bought anything on eBay (and the chances are you have), then think about your own behaviour. Buying from a seller with a low feedback rating makes you feel a little nervous and insecure, while buying from a PowerSeller with their reputation in the thousands doesn’t require any thought or fear – it feels just like buying from a shop.

A Bad Reputation Will Lose You Sales.

In fact, a bad reputation will lose you almost all your sales. If someone leaves you negative feedback, you will feel the pain straight away, as that rating will go right at the top of your user page for everyone to see. Who’s going to want to do business with you when they’ve just read that you “took a month to deliver the item”, or that you had “bad communication and sent a damaged item”? The answer is no-one.

Your next few items will need to be very cheap things, just to push that negative down the page. You might have to spend days or even weeks selling cheap stuff to get enough positive feedback to make anyone deal with you again.

It’s even worse if you consistently let buyers leave negative feedback – once you get below 90% positive ratings, you might as well be invisible.

You Can’t Just Open a New Account.

Besides eBay’s rules about only having one account, there are far more downsides than that to getting a new account. You literally have to start all over again from scratch.

You won’t be able to use all the different eBay features. Your existing customers won’t be able to find you any more. Your auctions will finish at a lower price because of your low feedback rating. Opening a new account is like moving to a new town to get away from a few people who are spreading rumours about you: it’s throwing out the baby with the bathwater.

A Good Reputation Will Get You Sales.

When a PowerSeller tells me something, I tend to believe them. They can be selling a pretty unlikely item, but if they guarantee it is what they say it is, then I trust them – they’re not going to risk their reputation, after all. This is the power of a reputation: people know you want to keep it, and they know you’ll go to almost any lengths to do so.

This is true even to the point that I would sooner buy something for $20 from a seller I know I can trust than for $15 from someone with average feedback. It’s worth the extra money to feel like the seller knows what they’re doing, has all their systems in place and will get me the item quickly and efficiently.

You really will find selling on eBay so much easier, and there’s only way to get a good reputation: make sure you please your customers every time. But some customers can be, well, just a little difficult to please. In my next blog entry, we ask: is the eBay customer always right?

Paul Burns Jr, Author “My”Space30 Blog

Be sure to check the buzz at http://www.mybloglog.com/buzz/members/pdbjr2005/, as well as

http://www.PDBJR2005.wordpress.com.,

del.icio.us/PDBJR2005 I am PDBJR2005 on del.icio.us
add PDBJR2005 to your network Add me to your network

http://technorati.com/claim/gcjthu3xp

Recent Readers

View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile

View Entire Community
Provided by MyBlogLog

Posted by: pdbjr2005 | September 12, 2007

“My”Space30 Examines eBay.Com Part 7

“My”Space30 Examines Ebay.Com Part 7
Category: Web, HTML, Tech

Hello Everyone.,

As you know I’m an Ebay PowerSeller, Id PDBJR2005, I am revealing my secrets in my blog, so today we continue to examine Ebay.Com.,

5 Simple Steps to Posting Your First eBay Auction.

It’s surprisingly simple to get started posting your very first auction on eBay. Here’s what you need to do.

Step 1: Open an eBay seller’s account.

If you’ve bought things on eBay, then you already have an account – just log in with it and click ‘Sell’ in the toolbar at the top of the page, then click ‘Create a seller’s account’. If you’ve never used eBay before, then you’ll need to open an account first using the ‘register’ link underneath the toolbar, and then click ‘Sell’ and ‘Create a seller’s account’. The eBay site will then guide you through the process. For security, this may involve giving card details and bank information.

Step 2: Decide what to sell.

For your first little experiment with eBay, it doesn’t really matter what you sell. Take a look around the room you’re in – I’m sure there’s something in there that you’re not all that attached to and could put in the post. Small books and CDs are ideal first items.

Step 3: Submit your item.

Click ‘Sell’, and you’re on your way to listing your item.

The first thing you need to do is choose a category – it’s best to just type in what the item is and let eBay choose for you. Next, write a title and description. Include key words you think people will search for in the title box, and all the information you have about the item in the description box.

Now set a starting price. $0.01 is the best starting price, as it draws people in to bid who otherwise wouldn’t, and items will almost never finish at such a low price. The next thing to set is the duration of the auction: 3, 5, 7 or 10 days. This is up to you: longer sales will usually get more bids, but will also seem to drag on forever. If you’ve taken a picture, add it now – items with pictures always sell for more. Finally, tick the payment methods you will accept (just PayPal is best for now), and where you will post to (limit yourself to your own country to begin with). Submit and you’re done!

Step 4: Wait for it to sell.

This is just a matter of sitting back and letting eBay do its thing – buyers will find your item and leave bids on it. Some bidders might email you with questions about the item, and you should do your best to answer these questions as quickly as you can.

Remember that if your item doesn’t sell then you can list it again for free.

Step 5: Collect payment and post it.

eBay will sent your buyer emails guiding them through the process of sending you payment for the item. Make sure you have the money before you send anything.

Once you’ve got the payment, all you need to do is pack the item for posting (make sure to use some bubble wrap), take the buyer’s address from the confirmation email eBay sent you, and write it on the parcel. Put some stamps on, post it, and you’re done!

I hope you enjoyed selling your first item. Now that you’re starting to get into it, the next blog entry will give you a checklist of things you need to do to be a successful seller.

Thank You.,

Paul Burns Jr., Author “My”Space30 Blog Community Blog

Be sure to check the buzz at http://www.mybloglog.com/buzz/members/pdbjr2005/, as well as

http://www.PDBJR2005.wordpress.com.,

del.icio.us/PDBJR2005 I am PDBJR2005 on del.icio.us
add PDBJR2005 to your network Add me to your network

http://technorati.com/claim/gcjthu3xp

Recent Readers

View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile

View Entire Community
Provided by MyBlogLog

Posted by: pdbjr2005 | September 12, 2007

“My”Space30 Examines eBay.Com Part 6

“My”Space30 Examines Ebay.Com Part 6
Category: Web, HTML, Tech

Hello Everyone.,

Learning the eBay “Lingo”.Do you have trouble sometimes understanding when people talk about eBay? Don’t worry, some of the jargon is really obscure, and you can’t be expected to understand it until someone’s told you what it means. Here’s a little list of some of the most useful lingo to know, but you don’t need to memorize it – even the most common jargon is only used relatively rarely.

Words.Bid: telling eBay’s system the maximum price you are prepared to pay for an item.
Dutch: an auction where more than one of an item is available.Feedback: positive or negative comments left about other users on eBay.Mint: in perfect condition.
Non-paying bidder: a bidder who wins an auction but does not then go on to buy the item.
PayPal: an electronic payment method accepted by most sellers.Rare: used and abused on eBay, now entirely meaningless.Reserve: the minimum price the seller will accept for the item.
Shill bid: a fake bid placed by a seller trying to drive up their auction’s price.Snail Mail: the post, which is obviously very slow compared to email.
Sniping: bidding at the last second to win the item before anyone else can outbid you.Abbreviations.
AUD: Australian Dollar. Currency.BIN: Buy it Now. A fixed price auction.
BNWT: Brand New With Tags. An item that has never been used and still has its original tags.BW: Black and White. Used for films, photos etc.
CONUS: Continental United States. Generally used by sellers who don’t want to post things to Alaska or Hawaii.
EUR: Euro. Currency.
FC: First Class. Type of postage.
GBP: Great British Pounds.
Currency.
HTF: Hard To Find. Not quite as abused as ‘rare’, but getting there.NIB: New in Box. Never opened, still in its original box.
NR: No Reserve. An item where the seller has not set a reserve price.
OB: Original Box. An item that has its original box (but might have been opened).
PM: Priority Mail.
PP: Parcel Post.
SH: Shipping and Handling.
The fees the buyer will pay you for postage.
USD: United States Dollars. Currency.
VGC: Very Good Condition. Not mint, but close.
The chances are that you’ll find more specific jargon related to whatever you’re selling, but it’d be an impossible task to cover it all here. If you can’t figure one out from your knowledge of the subject, then type the term into a search engine, followed by the word ‘ebay’. The chances are that someone, somewhere will have seen fit to explain it.While it’s good to be able to understand others’ jargon, avoid using it unless you really need to (for example, if you run out of space in an item’s title). Many people on eBay are not experienced buyers and you will lose them if you write a load of gobbledegook all over your auction.
By now, you’re well prepared for eBay life, and you’re probably ready to get started with that first auction. In the next blog Entry, we’ll show you how to dive in and get started.

Thank You.

Paul Burns Jr, Author “My”Space30 Blog Community Blog

Be sure to check the buzz at http://www.mybloglog.com/buzz/members/pdbjr2005/, as well as

http://www.PDBJR2005.wordpress.com.,

del.icio.us/PDBJR2005 I am PDBJR2005 on del.icio.us
add PDBJR2005 to your network Add me to your network

http://technorati.com/claim/gcjthu3xp

Recent Readers

View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile

View Entire Community
Provided by MyBlogLog

Posted by: pdbjr2005 | September 12, 2007

“My”Space30 Examines eBay.Com Part 16

“My”Space30 Examines eBay.Com Part 16
Current mood: creative
Category: Blogging

Hello Everyone.

Taming the eBay Search Engine.

If you know what you’re doing, you can quickly find what you’re looking for on eBay – and the more you know about how buyers find you, the easier you’ll find it to be found. Here are a few golden searching rules.

Be specific: If you’re searching for the first edition of the original Harry Potter book, you’ll get further searching for ‘harry potter rowling philosopher’s stone first edition’ than you will searching for ‘harry potter’. You’ll get fewer results, but the ones you do get will be far more relevant.

Spell wrongly: It’s a sad fact that many of the sellers on eBay just can’t spell. Whatever you’re looking for, try thinking of a few common misspellings – you might find a few items here that have slipped through the cracks.

Get a thesaurus: You should try to search for all the different words that someone might use to describe an item, for example searching for both ‘TV’ and ‘television’, or for ‘phone’, ‘mobile’ and ‘cellphone’. Where you can, though, leave off the type of item altogether and search by things like brand and model.

Use the categories: Whenever you search, you’ll notice a list of categories at the side of your search results. If you just searched for the name of a CD, you should click the ‘CDs’ category to look at results in that category only. Why bother looking through a load of results that you don’t care about?

Don’t be afraid to browse: Once you’ve found the category that items you like seem to be in, why not click ‘Browse’ and take a look through the whole category? You might be surprised by what you find.

Few people realise just how powerful eBay’s search engine is – a few symbols here and there and it’ll work wonders for you.

Wildcard searches: You can put an asterisk (*) into a search phrase when you want to say ‘anything can go here’. For example, if you wanted to search for a 1950s car, you could search for ‘car 195*’. 195* will show results from any year in the 1950s.

In this order: If you put words in quotes (“”) then the only results shown will be ones that have all of the words between the quote marks. For example, searching for “Lord of the Rings” won’t give you any results that say, for example “Lord Robert Rings”.

Exclude words: Put a minus, and then put any words in brackets that you don’t want to appear in your search results. For example: “Pulp Fiction” -(poster,photo) will find items related to Pulp Fiction but not posters or photos.

Either/or: If you want to search for lots of words at once, just put them in brackets: the TV example from earlier could become ‘(TV,television)’, which would find items with either word.

Don’t get too tied up learning the ways of the search engine, though: a surprising number of eBay users don’t search at all, preferring to look through eBay’s category system and save their favourites in their browser. The next blog entry will show you how to make sure these people can find you too.

Paul Burns Jr, Author “My”Space30 Blog

Be sure to check the buzz at http://www.mybloglog.com/buzz/members/pdbjr2005/, as well as

http://www.PDBJR2005.wordpress.com.,

del.icio.us/PDBJR2005 I am PDBJR2005 on del.icio.us
add PDBJR2005 to your network Add me to your network

http://technorati.com/claim/gcjthu3xp

Recent Readers

View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile
View My Profile

View Entire Community
Provided by MyBlogLog

Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.